Tags Posts tagged with "Mesh networking"

Mesh networking

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Just a simple light switch, you say? Look closer. Think Automatic’s Luminode dimmer switch hides both a processor and a mesh network connection that lets every switch in the home coordinate with each other. A multi-tap system makes it possible to link multiple lights together without extra wiring or complex programming, but that’s just the start: it’s possible to create “scenes” of predefined lighting levels and, with a USB adapter, hook up to home automation systems (including Think Automatic’s own) that can learn usage habits, track energy consumption or simply let us control the array with our smartphones. The platform uses raw XML to communicate and already talks to GEInsteon and Stargate hardware — all without requiring a huge grid of buttons or displays.

 

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A photograph of a metro Wi-Fi antenna in Minne...

Image via Wikipedia

The Seattle Police Department will transform its small legacy outdoor wireless mesh network into an 802.11n-based operation that will cover a wide geographic swatch of the city for IP video surveillance without the need for the complex routing necessary in legacy mesh networks.

The department’s current outdoor wireless mesh network consists of a handful of older-model Azalea Networks 802.11a/b/g access points, which are usually deployed around the city in a pair of high-tech Homeland Security command RVs.  Each RV is equipped with an Azalea MSR1000 dual-radio indoor wireless router. The department also has a pair of MSR2000 two-radio wireless mesh routers and five MST200 single-radio edge devices embedded in IP video surveillance tripods.

“The equipment allows the two vehicles to talk to each other and be networked together, and we can deploy battery-powered cameras within range of either vehicle so that we can bring video in from the scene,” said detective Monty Moss.

Typically one of the command vehicles is set up at the site of a major event, supporting cameras within 300 feet. The second command vehicle is then parked a block or so away, giving the team reach around a corner or through the buildings that are in the way, so it can add another camera, Moss explained. The command vehicles also collect wireless IP video surveillance feeds from third parties, such as nearby restaurants, to expand coverage of blind spots, he added. Read full article below